Home
Products
About Us
Factory Tour
Quality Control
Contact Us
Request A Quote
News
Home News

History of Artemisinin

China Shaanxi Y-Herb Biotechnology Co., Ltd. certification
China Shaanxi Y-Herb Biotechnology Co., Ltd. certification
We trust the quality of your products. It always the best. Keep this going, and we will establish a long-term relationship with you.

—— Mr. Carlos

The quality is very good! We have been Y-Herb’s customer for more than 4 years. Your good service and quality is excellent.

—— Nyles

Easy to talk with, very professional and fast delivery.

—— Jasper

Well received the parcel. Recently we placed an order but needed to update that order prior to shipment. The staff was very responsive and courteous. Professional!!

—— Mr. Smith

Very good company with nice service and high quality, One of our reliable supplier! It's very easy to work with you.

—— Michael

Most professional supplier that we have ever cooperated before. will order again soon.

—— Mr. Greg

I'm Online Chat Now
Company News
History of Artemisinin
Latest company news about History of Artemisinin

Artemisia Carvifolia is a common herb found in many parts of the world, and has been used by Chinese herbalists or more than 2000 years in the treatment of malaria. The earliest record dates back to 200 BC, in the "Fifty-two Prescriptions" unearthed from the Mawangdui Han Dynasty tombs. Its antimalarial application was first described, in Zhouhou Beiji Fang ("The Handbook of Prescriptions for Emergencies", Chinese: 肘后备急方), edited in the middle of the fourth century by Ge Hong; in that book, 43 malaria treatment methods were recorded. Images of the original scientific papers that record the history of the discovery, have been available online since 2006.

 
In 1967, a plant screening research program, under the name Project 523, was set up by the Chinese army to find an adequate treatment for malaria; the program and early clinical work were ordered of Chairman Mao Zedong at the request of North Vietnamese leaders to provide assistance for their malaria-ridden army. In the course of this research, Tu Youyou discovered artemisinin in the leaves of Artemisia Carvifolia (annual wormwood; 1972). The drug is named Qinghaosu in Chinese. It was one of many candidates tested as possible treatments for malaria by Chinese scientists, from a list of nearly 5000 traditional Chinese medicines. Tu Youyou also discovered that a low-temperature extraction process could be used to isolate an effective antimalarial substance from the plant; Tu says she was influenced by a traditional Chinese herbal medicine source "The Handbook of Prescriptions for Emergency Treatments" written in 340 BC by Ge Hong saying that this herb should be steeped in cold water. This book contained the useful reference to the herb: "A handful of qinghao immersed with two litres of water, wring out the juice and drink it all." Tu's team subsequently isolated a useful extract. The extracted substance, once subject to purification, proved to be useful starting point to obtain purified artemisinin. A 2012 review reported that artemisinin-based therapies were the most effective drugs for treatment of malaria at that time; It was also reported to clear malaria parasites from patients' bodies faster than other drugs. In addition to artemisinin, Project 523 developed a number of products that can be used in combination with artemisinin, including lumefantrine, piperaquine, and pyronaridine.

 

Results were published in the Chinese Medical Journal in 1979). The research was met with skepticism at first, partly because the chemical structure of artemisinin, particularly the peroxide portion, appeared to be too unstable to be a viable drug.

 

In the late 1990s, Novartis filed a new Chinese patent for a combination treatment with artemether and lumefantrine, providing the first artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs) (Coartem) at reduced prices to the World Health Organisation.In 2006, after artemisinin had become the treatment of choice for malaria, the WHO called for an immediate halt to single-drug artemisinin preparations in favor of combinations of artemisinin with another malaria drug, to reduce the risk of parasites developing resistance.

 

In 2011, Tu Youyou was awarded the prestigious Lasker-DeBakey Clinical Medical Research Award for her role in the discovery and development of artemisinin. The New York Times notes that the discovery of artemisinin is under consideration for a future Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.

Pub Time : 2018-01-04 10:40:39 >> News list
Contact Details
Shaanxi Y-Herb Biotechnology Co., Ltd.

Contact Person: Ms. Alice Lee

Tel: +86-18092591328

Fax: 86-029-81130242

Send your inquiry directly to us (0 / 3000)